Four Ingredients that Led to $84 Million and a Shared Vision for Indiana

Posted ago by Rich Overmoyer

Regional-Cities-UpdateYou may have missed the news out of Indiana two weeks ago  – no it wasn’t about that – it was the news that Indiana became the first state in the country to launch an economic development initiative focused on Quality of Place. This effort called the Indiana Regional Cities Initiative and now supported by $84 million, is an opportunity for Indiana’s regional communities to rally together to define what they can accomplish to enhance their communities. The visionary leadership of Indiana Governor Pence and Eric Doden, former President of the Indiana Economic Development Corporation, drove the creation of this initiative and it will pay dividends to Indiana’s communities for years to come.

National EPA Water Technology Innovation Cluster Leaders Meeting Held in April

Posted ago by Fourth Economy

WEN-EPA-Water-ClusterOn April 27, Fourth Economy market opportunity client The Water Economy Network (WEN) collaborated with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to cohost the National EPA Water Technology Innovation Cluster Leaders Meeting, at Pittsburgh’s Omni William Penn Hotel. 

New Investment and Programs Follow Altoona, PA’s Downtown Housing Study and Development Plan

Posted ago by Steve McKnight

Altoona-UpdateAt the end of 2014, Fourth Economy in partnership with Pfaffmann and Associates and Fourth River Development Company, completed a downtown housing market study and redevelopment plan for the City of Altoona in central Pennsylvania. This is another action plan being fully implemented by local stakeholders.  Several buildings were targeted as part of this study for redevelopment into market rate urban style apartments, condominiums and destination retail. Programmatic and financing strategies were also identified.

Fourth Economy Prepares Economic Plan for Lebanon, PA

Posted ago by Steve McKnight

City-of-Lebanon-UpdateAfter several months of stakeholder engagement and data analysis, the City of Lebanon, Pennsylvania along with hundreds of regional stakeholders came together in May 2015 to release its new economic plan, Grow Lebanon 2020.  Fourth Economy was engaged to assist the City in the plan’s development, action agenda and public release event.

Former Fourth Economy Client, Bedford County Planning, Advances “Pike2Bike” Plan

Posted ago by Steve McKnight

Pike-2-Bike-UpdateThis past April, Bedford County (PA) Planning Officials hosted one of several stakeholder tours of the decommissioned Rays Hill and Sideling Hill tunnels – tunnels that formerly served as Pennsylvania Turnpike auto tunnels.  The vision now is to convert those tunnels to serve hikers and bikers as part of a regional trail network. 

Beware of Black Boxes

Posted ago by Jerry Paytas

Beware-Black-BoxStatistics are like a bikini, what they reveal is interesting but what they conceal is vital.  A variety of “black box” applications are being introduced for economic and data analysis.  These tools claim to offer intelligently organized data that provides neatly packaged insights.

On the positive side, these tools are very helpful and they are democratizing economic and data analysis.  They enable the user to see a variety of indicators with a few clicks, or do drill down into various industry sectors.  They also enable users to easily combine and compare indicators.

Fourth Economy Releases 2015 County-by-County Competitiveness Analysis for Pennsylvania

Posted ago by Fourth Economy

PA-County-Competitiveness-Analysis-FEC-IndexNew analysis highlights the economic competitiveness of counties across the Commonwealth.

HARRISBURG, PA – Fourth Economy Consulting today announced the release of the 2015 Pennsylvania County Competitive Analysis, an assessment of how counties across the Commonwealth are performing economically. At the core, the analysis is based on the company’s Fourth Economy Community Index, which examines both statistical and qualitative factors at the county-level across the U.S. within the economic factors of investment, talent, sustainability, place, and diversity.

Trends in Town-Gown Collaboration

Posted ago by Tim Hindes

Trending-Town-GownToday’s economy elevates the value of higher education institutions to the highest degree of public awareness ever demonstrated. Higher education institutions impact their community in a host of very obvious ways, such as:

  • Supporting the development of 21st century talent armed with skills to drive modern business;
  • Employing a range of professionals in a sector often recognized as the largest in many small communities;
  • and Initiating research and development initiatives supporting the advancement of technology and improved economic performance.

These examples speak to the common ways nearly every institution engages. Yet, what does it mean for a campus to be truly connected to its community?

National Fourth Economy Community Index Lists Top Ten Large-Sized Counties

Posted ago by Fourth Economy

141204-FECIndex

Fourth Economy Consulting announces the latest release of its national community index, listing top counties from across the nation. The Fourth Economy Index highlights those communities ideally positioned to attract modern investment and managed economic growth within the fourth economy.

PITTSBURGH, PA – The latest edition of the Fourth Economy Community Index was announced today, recognizing the top ten large-sized Fourth Economy Communities. These communities—with populations between 150,000 and 499,999—were selected because they represent regions that are poised to achieve sustainable economic growth while attracting people and investment.


Working as a Freelancer

Posted ago by Susan Fisher

Freelance-Worker-DeskMore Americans are becoming freelancers, and enjoying the freedom of working independently and making their own decisions. Various studies predict that over 40 percent of the American workforce will be freelancing by 2020. Freelancing is what the “American Dream” is all about for many people. Basically, anything you might consider doing in your own business, you can do on a freelance basis under your own name.  Freelancers can be asked to do just about any kind of work you could imagine with no expectation of a permanent or long-term relationship with a single employer.