Talk is (Not) Cheap! Doing More to Connect Your Workforce to High-Opportunity Careers

Everyone is talking about workforce.

Thoughts around the impacts of an aging population, the need to attract diverse and skilled workers, the power of millennial talent, the technology skills gap, upskilling, the role of career and technical education (to name a few) are on the minds of every city and region seeking to get ahead of one of the leading threats to economic growth. Yet, talk is just that … talk. Though important, it is inaction that’s really costing regions their competitive advantage.

Fortunately, we know of and have invested time in places ready to do something about their current and future workforce challenges. Resonating in these places is a common resolution: connect job seekers to high-opportunity careers. Here’s a snapshot of what’s being done:

Apprenticeship Carolina
Apprenticeship Carolina

In places where quality training is limited, they are deepening connections between industry employers and technical colleges to create and expand apprenticeships for entry-level workers and mid-career talent. A “learn and earn” approach to training that entails a combination of classroom instruction, on-the-job-training and industry-specific skill development is proving to be a great model of success in places like South Carolina with its employer-focused Apprenticeship Carolina initiative.

In places where there’s a large pool of disadvantaged, underskilled talent, they are  leveling the playing field for job seekers by mitigating barriers to entry. Opportunity@Work’s offerings in underserved communities across the country extend beyond skills training to include efforts to transform employer hiring practices and reimagine education financing. Their efforts result in more equitable and fair hiring and options such as financing and wrap-around social services to make it easier for lower-income individuals to seek training and perform on the job.

In places where low-wage jobs are common, efforts are underway to increase access to better, higher wage jobs and improve job quality. Through the Apsen Institute’s Good Companies/Good Jobs initiative, communities are partnering with employers to incentivize and reform conditions for low-wage workers. Boston’s hotel industry is a benefactor of their efforts as front-desk clerks, housekeepers and the like are now making living wages and have increased opportunities for job advancement.

These are just some of the many actions cities and regions are taking to build a strong and more resilient workforce for today’s needs and tomorrow’s success. They aren’t just talking about it, they are doing something about it with strategies that are providing strong return on investment and ensuring an overall stronger economy.

Got solutions? We’d love to hear them. Want to do more? Get in touch – we’d love to help.