Fourth Economy’s Chris Ellis Contributes to Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Publication

Fourth Economy’s Social Innovation Strategist, Chris Ellis, recently had a contribution published in a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) book, Knowledge to Action: Accelerating Progress in Health, Well-Being, and Equity. This book is the inaugural volume of a publication series from the RWJF intended to catalyze discussion, engage new partners, and inspire action to build a Culture of Health in America. Chris’ contributions are included in a chapter that focuses on public, private, and nonprofit partnerships. The chapter examines the impact of these partnerships by highlighting Utah’s Pay for Success transaction that expanded access to high-quality preschool services for low-income children; a program that Chris managed before working at Fourth Economy. More information about the book, including ways to purchase it, can be found here.

Pay for Success Explained (and Illustrated)

By Chris Ellis and Sara Blumenstein

At Fourth Economy, we are interested in—and experts in—a new generation of funding mechanisms that are enabling the expansion of interventions with proven results. (See these posts from last year introducing Social Impact Bonds and Three Questions to ask to demonstrate impact.)

The key stakeholders involved in a Pay for Success transaction

 


Continue reading “Pay for Success Explained (and Illustrated)”

Three Questions to Demonstrate Impact

Last month, my colleague Chris Ellis shared some insight into Pay for Success as part of a larger conversation we’ve been having about innovative financing. Many of our clients are doing innovative work in the public and nonprofit sectors, and have found that thinking creatively about solutions often means facing challenges in securing the necessary resources to implement them. Pay for Success is one such promising model, and it relies heavily on the need to evaluate outcomes – which means that our approach to evaluation needs to be just as thoughtful and innovative as our approach to problem solving. Continue reading “Three Questions to Demonstrate Impact”

Innovative Financing: Paying for What Works

ellis-main-blog_imageA new generation of innovative funding tools is enabling change agents to expand programs that are meeting their community’s needs. Pay for Success (PFS) transactions, or Social Impact Bonds, represent an emerging financing mechanism that is driven by cross-sector partnerships, robust data, and a commitment to outcomes.

PFS utilizes upfront private investment to expand social programs that have proven results. In order to encourage this type of investment in their programs, service providers must be able to use data to show that their proposed intervention measurably improves outcomes for their clients and leads to an avoidance of cost. Additionally, these transactions depend on the collaborative efforts of a diverse set of stakeholders. PFS engages partners from the public, private, and nonprofit sectors in five critical roles: an investor who funds the expansion of the program; a service provider who administers the program; an independent evaluator who measures the effectiveness of the program; a public entity, or other outcome payer, who repays the investment based on the success of the program; and an intermediary who facilitates the partnerships and ensures that the project operates effectively and efficiently. Continue reading “Innovative Financing: Paying for What Works”