Upper Lawrenceville Community Visioning and Development Plan Receives “Great Places” Planning Award

Upper-LawrencevilleThe Environmental Design Research Association (EDRA), in partnership with Project for Public Spaces (PPS), has recognized evolveEA’s work in Upper Lawrenceville, also known as Pittsburgh’s 10th Ward, with a Great Places Award. The Upper Lawrenceville Targeted Development Strategy was developed through a series of charrettes led by evolveEA in which they helped the community craft a neighborhood identity and a series of principles guiding future development to achieve the community’s long-term livability goals. The principles built upon the existing physical and cultural legacy of Upper Lawrenceville but also were aspirational, seeding a vision for a future yet to come focused on economic, cultural and environmental issues.

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Arts, Culture and the Economy: Fourth Economy Participates in the Unsung Majority Rollout

141106-Art-CouncilAs part of our ongoing efforts to engage with the sectors that drive economic development, Fourth Economy joined the Pittsburgh Arts Research Committee (PARC)—an advisory committee to the Greater Pittsburgh Arts Council. The PARC worked with the Heinz Endowments and the Pittsburgh Foundation to review and comment on their study of small and mid-sized arts organizations in and around Pittsburgh, PA. On October 28, the Heinz Endowments and the Pittsburgh Foundation rolled out the final report with a daylong event including panel discussions, breakout sessions and networking called The Unsung Majority. Continue reading “Arts, Culture and the Economy: Fourth Economy Participates in the Unsung Majority Rollout”

Digital Placemaking: The New Frontier of Community Development

Over the past few decades we’ve seen an explosion of research and work in the science and art of placemaking. The importance of design, public space and public art is being broadly appreciated and implemented in communities around the world, often with stunning results. But in today’s world of social networking, mobile devices and nearly ubiquitous internet connectivity, are solely physical placemaking activities enough?

People look online first for everything these days, and communities are no exception. While it’s definitely vital for your community to have a welcoming, unique and livable physical presence, what is your community’s online presence like? Is it as fresh and lively as the new public square that was just finished, or is it a mish-mash of outdated websites, incorrect business listings and forum posts from 2003? Continue reading “Digital Placemaking: The New Frontier of Community Development”