Too Cool for School? Think Again.

141103-Higher-Ed-UEDAFourth Economy has been immersed this year in conversations about higher education’s role in economic development. Over the summer we worked with a major research university to identify ways for improving their business engagement practices. This effort involved hosting a roundtable discussion with university-based economic development practitioners from around the country.

In October, Fourth Economy team members managed the 2014 University Economic Development Association (UEDA) Summit in Santa Fe, New Mexico, which brought together more than 230 economic development representatives from higher education, economic development organizations, consulting firms, federal agencies, and many other groups (you can view the agenda and presentations here). Conference participants shared and discussed best practices, including initial thought leadership from UEDA’s Body of Knowledge Committee, developed in conjunction with representatives from the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU). Continue reading “Too Cool for School? Think Again.”

Best Practices for the Fourth Economy – University Economic Development Association (UEDA) Announces 2012 Awards of Excellence Winners

Effectively engaging higher education resources for community is economic development is critical to success in the fourth economy.  Earlier this year, the Fourth Economy team was hired by the University Economic Development Association (UEDA) to help the organization advance its strategic mission – a mission to leverage higher education and enhance our national competitiveness.

UEDA announced its 2012 Awards of Excellence winners during its Annual Summit held this October in Chattanooga, Tennessee.   The Awards of Excellence Program recognizes UEDA members who are transforming their campuses into engines of economic prosperity through leading edge initiatives in five categories: 1) Community Connected Campus: initiatives that promote the physical development of quality connected campuses and their surrounding communities; 2) Research and Analysis:  initiatives that enhance the capacity of colleges and universities to provide new forms of research and tools for community, economic and workforce development practitioners; 3) Leadership and Collaboration: initiatives that support the development of collaborative economic development strategies and the leaders required to implement them; 4) Innovation and Entrepreneurship: initiatives designed to support startups, high-growth companies and clusters within a region; and 5) Talent Development: initiatives that promote the development of 21st-century skills.  Continue reading “Best Practices for the Fourth Economy – University Economic Development Association (UEDA) Announces 2012 Awards of Excellence Winners”

Fourth Economy Helps Advance University Economic Development Association (UEDA) Mission and Impact

By now we all know that talent, innovation and quality place-based strategies are at the heart of the fourth economy.  Earlier this year, the Fourth Economy team was hired by the University Economic Development Association (UEDA) to help the organization advance its strategic mission – a mission to leverage higher education and enhance our national competitiveness.

Our first year efforts culminated in one of the largest Annual Summit’s since the organization’s founding.  More than 175 delegates convened in Chattanooga, Tennessee in October for the three-day conference.

“There has never been a more important time for this delegation to convene than now,” said William Michalerya, UEDA President. “In the next few weeks, there will be a national election and regardless of the outcome, there will be a renewed discussion and interest in how best our Country should leverage its innovation assets and make key investments in those resources,” Michalerya added. Continue reading “Fourth Economy Helps Advance University Economic Development Association (UEDA) Mission and Impact”

Poll Results: The Fourth Economy Index

While we continue to develop this idea, we asked you to provide your confidence level in some broad economic categories. These categories impact areas of the Fourth Economy Index. As you can see from the image above, the overall confidence level in our economic state is less confident, or neutral, than confident in where the economy is heading. There doesn’t appear to be much that we are “very confident” about. Let’s examine how we determined this overall confidence level… Here are the broad categories we asked about… As you can see, the areas of most confidence include the U.S. economy, private sector leadership and innovation investment. The remaining four categories lagged behind greatly, with our educational system having the least amount of backing, considering all neutral attributes. We also asked you to tell us what other economic categories we should measure. The responses were great and included: environmental protection, workforce capacity/ability, collaboration, access to capital, natural resources, U.S. utility patents issued, U.S. technologies licensed, U.S. new high tech products introduced, U.S. R&D investment in technologies, State investments in TBED activities, U.S. manufacturing sales, U.S. exports, U.S. manufacturing jobs created, ROI on federal R&D investment, private funding of tech-based companies, job growth in tech-based sectors, and new ratios such as energy per dollar and productivity in manufacturing sectors. What else should we be measuring to determine the overall state of our Fourth Economy? Use the comments below… Take this month’s poll: Rank the top energy innovations in the last 100 years…