The TechBelt Initiative Receives Excellence in Economic Development Award from the International Economic Development Council (IEDC)

131016-IEDC-TechBelt-AwardA multi-state, economic growth accelerator, the TechBelt initiative has been recognized with a Bronze Excellence in Economic Development Award from the International Economic Development Council (IEDC).  Presented on Oct. 8 at the 2013 IEDC Annual Conference in Philadelphia, the award honors this virtual organization in category of “Regionalism & Cross-Border Collaboration” in communities with populations of greater than 500,000.

The TechBelt initiative is a network of technology and innovation stakeholders collaborating to accelerate economic growth in northeast Ohio, western Pennsylvania and northern West Virginia – states with contiguous borders and complementary industrial and academic assets.  TechBelt members are broad-based, representing the economic development organizations, foundations, researchers and chambers of commerce within the “mega region.” Continue reading “The TechBelt Initiative Receives Excellence in Economic Development Award from the International Economic Development Council (IEDC)”

Four Lessons for Effective Collaboration

Over the past two years, Fourth Economy has provided project management for a number of clients and projects.  The common theme for all of these projects is “collaboration.”  Economic development is increasingly a collaborative enterprise.  Economies don’t fit neatly into our administrative and jurisdictional silos.  As a result, economic development requires working with a variety of partners.  So it is no surprise that a lot of the work we do as consultants includes organizing and coordinating collaborative partnerships. Continue reading “Four Lessons for Effective Collaboration”

Regional Collaboration Beyond the Press Release: The TechBelt Model

Download a PDF of this Article: Regional Collaboration Beyond the Press Release – The TechBelt Model Collaboration is a contact sport. “Regional collaboration” has long been a somewhat idyllic phrase within technology-based economic development circles. Beyond the websites and trade show booths, its rare to find “collaboration” expressed in an every day operating plan. Geography, municipal boundaries, political districts and competing organizations provide real challenges for regional initiatives to find and sustain common ground. With the announcement of the Federal Regional Innovation Cluster (RICs) initiative in March of 2010, those barriers are becoming more transparent. That initiative defined RICs as “geographically-bounded and active networks of similar, synergistic or complementary organizations which leverage their region’s unique competitive strengths to create jobs and broader prosperity.” Since its launch, the RIC initiative has established several programs such as the Jobs and Innovation Accelerator, the Energy Regional Innovation Cluster and the I6 Green Challenge, all of which leverage technical resources and financial incentives to help formalize networks and link key assets in tangible and responsive ways. Continue reading “Regional Collaboration Beyond the Press Release: The TechBelt Model”

Comeback Kids

  Admittedly it is awkward to boast about the economic recovery that is occurring in much of the Rust Belt. In our own neck of the woods, Akron, Cleveland, Pittsburgh and Youngstown have all experienced strong recoveries. According to Brookings Youngstown Ohio ranked 8th out of 100 metro areas for job growth. Yes, Youngstown Ohio. Here are a few insights from Brookings’ Metro Monitor:

  • Manufacturing regions in general led the recovery – Recovery in the automotive sector has helped the auto-producing regions – Recovery in Information Technology has also helped the IT regions.
  • There might be signs of the regional impact of stimulus – “The metropolitan areas with the strongest economic recoveries generally gained government jobs, while those with the weakest recoveries generally lost them. Eleven of the 20 strongest-recovering metropolitan areas (Bakersfield, Boston, Dallas, Des Moines, Houston, McAllen, New Orleans, Provo, San Jose, Worcester, and Youngstown) gained government jobs (federal (including military), state, and local combined) in the time since their total employment bottomed out, while one (Lakeland) had no change in government employment.?”

I think these findings have interesting implications for the national debate going on right now about our economy and the role of the federal government. We always seem to want a clear Yes or No, Stop or Go type of answer and in a complex economy like the U.S. that is never easy. The truth is that what works for one region does not work for another. Maybe what is wrong is our idea of a national economic policy. It might work better if we created regional policies and plans to address the unique needs of regional employers, workers and the environment. The Obama Administration has attempted to do this with their support for Regional Innovation Clusters, but I think it will take a more fundamental restructuring of how federal agencies work. As long as we try to fit square regional pegs into round national policies, we are going to continue to be frustrated with our economic policy.

Regional Innovation Clusters: The TechBelt Initiative (a best practice)

If you work in economic development or are in a business that thrives on innovation you have probably heard about regional innovation clusters or some version of the theme. With the White House promoting Startup America with a focus innovation and entrepreneurship from coast to Cleveland and looking to regions as partners you soon may have a regional innovation cluster map drawn over your workplace.

The core model of economic clusters is not new but the approach has evolved over the years. For a unique approach and a best practice I recommend the TechBelt Initiative. TechBelt has been linking economic development activities in the Cleveland, Youngstown and Pittsburgh corridor for several years now.

 

In full disclosure I am biased to proclaim the TechBelt Initiative a best practice since my firm is staff the effort. I do have objectivity as my team works with innovation-based economic development groups throughout the country. There are a lot of great efforts underway and all can learn from one another. What TechBelt can share is the following:

First, the TechBelt Initiative operates under an approach of what Ed Morrision calls Strategic Doing, which is simply explained as a “learning by doing” model. The TechBelt relies less on overproduced studies and more on instinct and ‘just in time analysis’ to understand the best direction to take and investments to make.

Second, the TechBelt has chosen an approach that limits formality and bureaucracy to allow for rapid team building and responsive decision-making. This allows over three-dozen organizations to work together collaboratively and not get hung up on who is in charge.

Third, the TechBelt has regional leaders of organizations that care deeply about their communities and organizations they serve – but also see the value of building the larger regional community.

Finally, that last word in the preceding sentence, Community, is why the TechBelt region is different. The work that is being done at times is proactive and other reactive but in both cases we are bringing together individuals who are sharing their vision, their ideas for the region and are getting to know one another. As the world begins to recognize the value of open innovation, this TechBelt community is what matters most. The friendships that are being built will support the accomplishment of great things both now and in the future.

I invite others to share their ideas about what is working in their regional innovation clusters and together we will help define the next phase of innovation-based economic development strategy.